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20140426
20140504
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
merkel because of the relationship that germany has with russia and because the germans are considered so central to bringing the europeans along. and you could see today in the rose garden the struggle that the europeans. you could see it on display. because she said a number of times we will go to the next tier. and she described the trigger for that being the may 25 elections that are scheduled in ukraine. if they're disrupted, if there's a provocation that prevents them from going forward. but she kept saying, but this is not what we want to do. and she also very forcefully indicated that most of the european nations understand at they would be hurt if the energy sector is in the next tranch of serious economic sanctions. because many of the european countries get a majority if not almost all of their oil and gas -- >> it would hit average citizens. >> it would affect the global economy. and president obama has not been secretive about that. he has also indicated that. his body language with chancellor merkel was very conciliatory to this concept. and he actually did volunteer today i
the world is unified. there's real differences about what to do, have germany, and take other members of the european community. >> the eastern europeans. >> charlie: how does the president handle that? does he go off on his own and put troops here and there and do this and that or does he wait and try to get some kind of unified plan? >> i think he needs to do a little more leading from in front. i think he has to do both a major effort to keep the united states and europe together, understanding that the european dependence on russian energy is going to make it tough, and on trade with russia. german trade with russia is huge and ours is tiny. but, on the other hand, the europeans have 60 years of sort of relying on us for leadership in international affairs and particularly on national security, and they are not yet ready to be co-leaders, and i think a little more american leadership on this would have been important, even while we understand and agree with the point he's making. >> charlie: syria. when the president made the decision not to attack syria after having said it had c
and germany's chancellor merkel met at the white house today where the ukraine crisis took center stage after russia declared the recent geneva agreement brokered with the west to diffuse tensions was dead. jeffrey brown reports. >> we are united in our determination to impose costs on russia for its actions, >> brown: in the white house rose garden this afternoon, there were strong words for moscow. the president warned more severe economic penalties are coming unless russian leader vladimir putin backs off. >> our hope is, is that we shouldn't have to use them. we're not interested in punishing the russian people. we do think that mr. putin and his leadership circle are taking bad decisions and unnecessary decisions and he needs to be dissuaded from his current course. >> brown: mr. obama said there will be no choice but to act if russia disrupts ukraine's presidential election on may 25th. chancellor merkel agreed. >> ( translated ): the 25th of may is not all that far away. should that not be possible to stabilize the situation, further sanctions will be unavoidable. this is something tha
is not an egyptian novelty. you have it in spain, in ireland, in germany, in italy. that's the first point. the response here is to violence, primarily. secondly, what's declared terrorism or a terrorist organization is the organization itself. our present president has said that, according to our constitution, any egyptian who is not found guilty of a crime and is ready to work according to constitution peacefully still has a role in politics. that has not been taken away from them. but no egyptian, be that an islamist, and the brotherhood is not the only one, the brotherhood or someone like me who is more towards a secularist, and if i decide i'm not going to work beyond the constitution or want to be b beyond it, i don't have a role in politics. we have a challenge to come together. the next president will have that challenge. but i don't really believe that the government is reacting to a political issue. it's reacting to violence. >> charlie: you really believe that? >> i really do. >> charlie: now, this extreme measure, taking that step of sentencing all these people to death is the
borrowing. in europe, germany has a growth rate of 8%, turkey has a growth rate of 4%. this is all good for all to see. it is because people appreciate that they have voted 45.5% in favor of this government. otherwise, why would they keep a corrupt government in place? i'll come to the economy in a moment. let's stay with this for a second. the question was raised that you look back at the same people who were there prosecuting the military and you seem to agree with it at the time. but then when they came after you, you looked back at what they did to the military and said maybe that was not good. have you changed your mind about the legitimacy of the prosecution against the military? >> let me tell you one thing. we are always against wrongdoing. when the chief of general staff was arrested, i made some statements then. if you go back and look at those statements, you will see that i have said that i did not think it right for him to be kept in custody and be prosecuted in this way, and i also said at the time that it was not these courts but that he should have been subject to the ju
like that of britain or germany or places like that. >> but, professor, there seems to also be a debate even if they change the tax, even if they make it desirable for the american companies to bring their overseas money back to the u.s. it doesn't necessarily mean that they are going to invest it here to boost our economy and hire more people. do you agree with that? >> it may not happen immediately. look, when profits come home from abroad, companies will use them for all sorts of purposes but in the long run, allowing a more efficient reallocation of resources within the companies can only be good from the standpoint of productivity that leads to economic opportunity. >> what, professor, is at the heart of this technique? is it the repatriation in one of the pieces $69 billion of pfizer's cash that's domiciled overseas or is it just year to year being able to take advantage of a lower corporate tax rate or is it that we double tax corporate profits in the united states? what is it? >> there are three things that britain offers that the united states does not. the first is as your seg
-soviets and because stallen starved the ukranians and they never forgot. >> germany in 1941 occupied entire ukraine. they immediately enslaved large portions of the population with the help of ukraine it was the entire jewish population of ukraine and a lot of forced labor backed germany to help work in the war industry. after the war, ukraine, the second most populist soviet republic enjoyed an almost special status within the 15 republics of the u.s.s.r. >> the relationship between the russians and ukranians was much closer than any other nick group. >> nikita kruschev ceded crimea to ukraine. during the next on 40 years, people in the ukraine were represented in the soviet elite. and breshnev, who presided over the soviet union for two decades was actually born in ukraine. kimberly martin was a political science professor at columbia university and barnard college. >> if you go through who the personnel were in top-ranking positions in both of the politics of the communist party and also in terms of who were the the industrial leaders, who were the military leaders and who were the leaders in th
to at a cost to some of their business partners in the west, most of all germany. we're joined tonight in washington by the executive director of the transatlantic academy. and steven, it's clear that the stakes are higher in europe rather than the united states when it comes to the situation with russia, but just for context, can you tell us what are the most significant economic ties between europe and russia? and most specifically germany because of its position as a power player? >> yes. well, first of all, with the german case, energy is a very big factor. they getn't about a third of their energy from russia, both gas and oil. that's a major player. also, the german energy companies are very closely linked in with other russian companies. so there's a really close interlocking between these two. secondly, they sell a lot of automobiles and manufacturing to russia, engineering is a big thing. i think up with of the most interesting facts i've seen recently is the head of seimans went to moscow the week after the annexation of crimea and met with putin and assured them that they wo
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)